Entries in woodland garden (89)

Sunday
Oct092016

Getting Through October

I plan to get up early tomorrow and spend the day cleaning the garden and getting rid of the dead stuff. I will feel better if I don't have to look at the brittle corpses of plants that once were healthy and full of blooms. We have had no rain since the bit we got two weeks ago, and the weatherman is saying the current drought will extend at least until November.

We just need to get through October. Many leaves are shriveling on the trees and shrubs, then falling in gray heaps. The grass is crispy tan. But I am fortunate to have a lot of evergreens that adapt to whatever the climate delivers; so at a glance the garden doesn't look too bad.


This is a view overlooking the woodland garden. The 'Saybrook Gold' junipers have proved durable through all seasons.

A little farther up the drive from the 'Saybrook Gold' junipers is my beloved 'Feelin' Blue' Deodar Cedar. Behind it is a Trident Maple, a Forsythia, and a huge Southern Magnolia.

This Anise 'Florida Sunshine' has prospered in the woodland garden with minimal care. The leaves have a wonderful fragrance.

Mahonia 'Soft Caress' is another woodland garden plant that has done well though our drought. It took a couple of years to become established and needed babying at first, but now it has begun to thrive.

Here are a few additional shots I took as I walked around this afternoon:My Fuyu Persimmon tree is still growing in a pot, though I plan to transplant it someday. The fruit is almost ready to pick.

Our sweet bell peppers did poorly through the summer, and I was getting ready to pull them up when I noticed new growth in September. I began a fresh regimen of watering and fertilizing with fish emulsion, and look at them now! One of them is turning red. For maximum flavor I like to leave them on the vine until they have fully ripened.

Assorted ornamental kale adds a pretty accent to the fall vegetable garden. It's edible but not particularly tasty.

Look close. Do you see the ants? I did not see them until I enlarged the photo on my computer. Now I need to see if this Asclepias has aphids!

These common asters are blooming despite almost total neglect. A pure golden green sweat bee ( Augochlora pura) appreciates the nectar.

 

Sunday
Jul172016

Deep Green World

The shady areas of my garden are lush and restful. In July they have become a deep green world with accents of white and an occasional pop of pink, orange or burgundy. The woodlands are a welcome shelter from the white hot sun. It is not the time of year for heavy or even moderate gardening, but for languid strolls, embracing the moist tropical air and keeping a bottle of cold water at hand. I take my time. I pause to take in the overall view, then slowly search out details of individual plants.

Here are some images from my deep green world. Some views will be familiar to those who regularly follow my blog, but I like to provide images through the changing seasons:

This very old birdhouse in the Trident maple has acquired a mossy patina.

 

Ligularia

Hardy begonia

Stromanthe 'Tricolor' is a potted tropical plant that spends the winter indoors.

Variegated toad lily

Zantedeschia

Hepatica, also called liverwort

Autumn fern peeks between leaves of Hosta 'Francis Williams.'

Dracaena marginata is another tropical plant that comes inside for the winter.

A potted ivy hangs from a decorative bracket beneath a birdhouse near the entrance to the woodland garden.

The sun glinting off this fern was almost too bright, until I turned it black and white:

Hydrangea 'Lady in Red' remains one of my favorite woodland plants:

Cercis canadensis ‘Whitewater’

Clockwise from top left: Pieris japonica; Hosta 'Sum and Substance' bloom; Snowflake hydrangea; Variegated hydrangea; Limelight hydrangea; A summer-blooming native azalea.

I hope you enjoyed these views of my deep green world. Have a great week!  Deb